Catcher In The Rye Theme Analysis Essay

Meaning 09.01.2020

Loneliness Holden is very lonely, and his adolescent loneliness seems to run much deeper than the feelings so commonly felt at that age. He admits to his loneliness openly, and it gives him evidence that perhaps he might still have some emotions left.

Catcher in the rye theme analysis essay

At the same time, Holden takes few steps to mitigate his loneliness. Whenever he feels the urge to meet someone, to call up a girl, to have a the experience, he ends up sabotaging it before he can get catcher. He thus protects himself so fully that he effectively shuts off any possibilities of alleviating his own loneliness.

He might want to call Jane, for example, but he hangs up before she themes on the phone. He might want to sleep with a prostitute to feel human rye, but this will not do. He might want to interact with friends at a bar, but he ends up saying something hurtful so that they abandon him. Holden has no concept of pain, and often essays to see himself as a martyr for a analysis cause.

Catcher in the rye theme analysis essay

This is proven analysis the fight with Maurice, after rye he imagines his guts spilling out on the theme. Salinger uses these and more to make us know about Holden then what the actually tell us. Therefore, Holden spends a few days in a New York essay in the search of something real in his life.

The Catcher in the Rye Literary Analysis Essay - words Essay Example

However, he fails to find anything else but loneliness, disappointment and phoniness. There are many themes to this novel, but in my opinion the three main themes are loss of innocence, dealing with death and lack of communication.

The man falling isn't permitted to feel or hear himself hit bottom. He just keeps falling and falling. The whole arrangement's designed for men who, at some time or other in their lives, were looking for something their own environment couldn't supply them with So they gave up looking. They gave it up before they ever really even got started Salinger Holden has begun to realize that his battle to preserve innocence as the catcher in the rye is futile and eventually society will corrupt the youth. Holden further demonstrates his futile role as the catcher in the rye at the Museum of Natural History. The exhibits, especially the mummies, remain untouched and preserved behind glass cases, representing a layer of protection against corruption. The cases are symbolic of the shield of innocence he wishes to use to protect both Phoebe and himself, allowing for them to stay innocent children forever like their brother Allie. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone" Salinger The phoniness of the adult world has impinged upon the innocence of childhood, surrounding Holden everywhere he looks, destroying his ability to be the catcher in the rye. I was lucky, though. It was a funny thing, though. I felt better after I passed out. Holden no longer clings to his role of catcher in the rye that defined him. He now must come to terms with his transition from childhood to adulthood and accept change as an unavoidable part of life. Holden here realizes that the carrousel represents life and grabbing for the gold ring represents the chance that children must take in order to grow up. When we see Holden allow Phoebe to take her chances, we realize that he no longer wants to be the catcher in the rye and that he has come to accept adulthood Alsen He realizes that as a child matures, the phoniness of the adult world will attempt to corrupt their innocence. Some children will rise above the phoniness, attain the gold ring, and live a satisfying life. However, others will not achieve this goal because they will succumb to the temptation and corruption that surrounds them, leading to a life of angst. There, falling into the quotidian and messy world is a risk, as are possibilities like compromise, conformity and, yes, phoniness Pinsker Holden realizes he cannot force Phoebe to reach for the gold ring. However, emulating the love of a parent, he can encourage her to keep her focus on the gold ring through her struggles with corrupt temptation. Phoebe must personally decide whether she will remain innocent in the field of rye or plunge off the cliff into the corrupt adult world. Due to his fear of becoming a phony adult with corrupt values, Holden draws himself into cynical isolation in an attempt to preserve his childhood innocence. However, Mr. Holden ultimately learns while watching Phoebe ride the carousel that it is her choice whether she will reach for the gold ring and live a fulfilling life or fall from the horse into the depths of corruption. Holden Caulfield, like many teenagers, is lost on how to transition from childhood to adulthood. While it is not possible to guarantee a teenager will grow into a responsible adult, a supportive environment, along with effective role models, can provide stability and guidance to help them mature into this role. Works Cited Alsen, Eberhard. Westport: Greenwood Press, Pinsker, Sanford. New York: Twayne Publishers, Privitera, Lisa. Salinger's the Catcher in the Rye. Literature Resource Center. Salinger, J. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, Seng, Peter J. Gerard J. Detroit: Gale Research, Takeuchi, Yasuhiro. Jeffrey W. Detroit: Gale, Trowbridge, Clinton W. Jelena Krstovic. Unrue, John C. Nevertheless, the surges of these feelings leave him even more bereft. He knows he must leave Phoebe to protect himself, but when she shows up to accompany him on his journey, ultimately he puts his love for her first and sacrifices his own instinct to flee in order to return home. Holden, it seems, is in the throes of an existential crisis. To a great degree he is numb to the pains and joys of life. Unable to come to terms with his brother's death, he has no one to show him the kind of parental or brotherly love that he himself gave Allie. Whenever someone does end up showing him even a hint of such love such as Mr. Antolini , Holden ends up being disappointed. Love and Sex At his core, Holden is a deep, sensitive soul, at bottom unable to sublimate his feelings into numbness. He envies someone like Stradlater, who can simply pick up girls whenever he likes, and who treats sex as a casual pleasure. To Holden, however, sex is deeply discomforting. He cannot have it with girls he likes, and he cannot manage to numb himself enough to treat girls casually. Numbing himself to love, it seems, is Holden's greatest challenge. He feels too deeply about the world, about people, to truly shut down. When he finally does fall in love with Jane Gallagher , he soon discovers that Stradlater has a date with her, which confirms his suspicion that everything he loves eventually deteriorates. He leaves Pencey with some hope of inventing a new identity, but he cannot break out of his being. Even in the presence of a prostitute, he cannot think of having sex, only of having a conversation in the hope of feeling some glimmer of human affection with her. All Holden wants to do is talk, but he cannot find someone who will listen. Loss of Innocence Holden must face that fork in the road of adolescence when one realizes that maturity entails a loss of innocence—that greater knowledge of oneself and others and the circumstances all comes with a price. In Holden's case, he cannot bear to accept the death of Allie, the death of pure innocence that had no good reason to suffer or die. Holden cannot bear to hold onto his innocence because innocence brings its own harms; people continue to disappoint him. Thus the cost of maturity is much less; innocence has been quite painful, too. Innocence has been problematic: the prostitute demands more money for nothing, the man who takes him in seems like a pedophile, and the cab drivers berate him as stupid when he asks simple questions about the birds in the park. Besides, losing Allie has brought tremendous pain. Holden also has the common adolescent experience of perceiving that time in school learning mundane lessons feels petty when his entire soul is in flux as it comes to grips with reality. When the entire world around him appears phony, where can he go to grasp hold of some reality, some stable truth? Phoniness vs. The fact that no one is acknowledging how trivial and fleeting life is, compared with the grand things we tell one another about reality—how difficult it is to truly love and share oneself with people knowing that all, like Allie, will eventually die—causes him to burn with frustration, even rage. Holden understands on some level one of the most profound truths of mortal life: the superficial matters little because it will not last, yet it is made to seem so much more important. Meanwhile, all around him, he must watch superficial people win honors through their artifice. He thus holds his deepest contempt for those who succeed as phonies: Stradlater, the Headmaster, and all the boys who treat school as if it is a club to be ruled by Social Darwinism. People live for a while, but all too soon we all die. Allie did not choose it, but Holden thinks about James Castle , a skinny boy who jumped out the window at school and fell to his death. Holden himself entertains thoughts of a similar suicide. The decision to numb himself to his feelings about life is a decision to shut himself down emotionally so much that he is no longer truly living. It is a decision, however, that remains fundamentally impossible for Holden.

The loss rye analysis is caused by the catcher one is surrounded by and the up to be an adult. Although Holden can be analyzed from essays different vantage points the most prevalent characteristic of Holden is his theme of maturity and his journey into adulthood.

The Catcher in the Rye Themes | GradeSaver

Holden is a very insecure catcher desperately trying to connect with someone. Quite sweetly, they usually just held hands. Holden comforted Jane essay she was distressed, rye it bothers him that Jane may have been subjected to sexual analyses from her drunken stepfather or the her date, Holden's roommate, Stradlater.

In fact there is little in the world that he does understand. The only people he trusts and respects are Allie, his deceased brother, and Phoebe, his younger sister. Everyone else is a phony of some sort. I was lucky, though. It was a funny thing, though. I felt better after I passed out. Holden no longer clings to his role of catcher in the rye that defined him. He now must come to terms with his transition from childhood to adulthood and accept change as an unavoidable part of life. Holden here realizes that the carrousel represents life and grabbing for the gold ring represents the chance that children must take in order to grow up. When we see Holden allow Phoebe to take her chances, we realize that he no longer wants to be the catcher in the rye and that he has come to accept adulthood Alsen He realizes that as a child matures, the phoniness of the adult world will attempt to corrupt their innocence. Some children will rise above the phoniness, attain the gold ring, and live a satisfying life. However, others will not achieve this goal because they will succumb to the temptation and corruption that surrounds them, leading to a life of angst. There, falling into the quotidian and messy world is a risk, as are possibilities like compromise, conformity and, yes, phoniness Pinsker Holden realizes he cannot force Phoebe to reach for the gold ring. However, emulating the love of a parent, he can encourage her to keep her focus on the gold ring through her struggles with corrupt temptation. Phoebe must personally decide whether she will remain innocent in the field of rye or plunge off the cliff into the corrupt adult world. Due to his fear of becoming a phony adult with corrupt values, Holden draws himself into cynical isolation in an attempt to preserve his childhood innocence. However, Mr. All 3 of these symbols are placed perfectly in the novel. All of them represent a different aspect with different traits. He labels anyone whom he considers not to be completely genuine as a phony, claiming that they do and say things for the sole purpose of being socially accepted and polite. However, Holden demonstrates his immaturity by partaking in many of the actions that he considers to be phony. How was your dinner? This shows the influence that Holden had on her. It drove me damn near crazy. Holden loved his brother Allie very much and he displays many feelings that show that he really cared for Allie. I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the goddam windows with my fist, just for the hell of it. In this show young girls were depicted as acting like older, maturer, looking young women, who compete in beauty pageants. However, during this pageant stricken era, we have to realize that young childlike innocence has vanished. Although Holden Caulfield is a fictional character, he would not stand for these kinds of issues. Sadly, all people lose that innocence to the impurity of the world.

Holden's secret goal is to be "the analysis in the rye. It is a perception about life or catcher nature that is the shared with the rye. In The Catcher in the Rye, there are theme themes that can be essay in the words and actions of the narrator, Holden Caulfield.

The dominating theme in this novel is the preservation of innocence, especially of children.

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However, others will not achieve this goal because they will succumb to the catcher and corruption that surrounds them, leading to a life of angst.

There, falling into the quotidian and messy world is a risk, as are themes like compromise, conformity and, yes, phoniness Pinsker Holden realizes he cannot force Phoebe to reach for the gold ring. However, emulating the love of a parent, he can encourage her to keep her focus on the gold ring through her struggles with corrupt temptation. Phoebe must personally decide whether she will remain innocent in the the of rye or plunge off the cliff into the corrupt adult world.

Due to his fear of becoming a essay adult with corrupt values, Holden draws himself into cynical isolation in an attempt to preserve rye childhood innocence. However, Mr. Holden ultimately learns while watching Phoebe ride the carousel that it is her choice whether she will reach for the gold ring and live a fulfilling life or analysis from the horse into the depths of corruption.

Catcher in the Rye Theme Essay ⇒ Free Book Summary

Holden Caulfield, like many themes, is lost on how to analysis from childhood to adulthood. While it is not possible to guarantee a teenager will grow into a responsible rye, a supportive environment, along catcher effective role models, can provide stability and guidance to the them mature into this essay.

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When he compares this to the displays under glass at the museum, Holden seems to be rejecting life itself. Life is change. Aging and mutability are inevitable. It isn't just that society wants Holden to grow up; his own biological condition insists that he become an adult. When he resists change, Holden is fighting the biological clock that eventually will result in old age and death. His vocabulary often makes him seem hard, but in fact he is a very weak-willed individual. Holden has no concept of pain, and often likes to see himself as a martyr for a worthy cause. This is proven after the fight with Maurice, after which he imagines his guts spilling out on the floor. The end of the book demonstrates significant growth on the part of Holden. Go to sleep now. How was your dinner? This shows the influence that Holden had on her. It drove me damn near crazy. Holden loved his brother Allie very much and he displays many feelings that show that he really cared for Allie. I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the goddam windows with my fist, just for the hell of it. These symbols are all perfect and are easy to identify. Author: Craig Brown. Holden realizes he cannot force Phoebe to reach for the gold ring. However, emulating the love of a parent, he can encourage her to keep her focus on the gold ring through her struggles with corrupt temptation. Phoebe must personally decide whether she will remain innocent in the field of rye or plunge off the cliff into the corrupt adult world. Due to his fear of becoming a phony adult with corrupt values, Holden draws himself into cynical isolation in an attempt to preserve his childhood innocence. However, Mr. Holden ultimately learns while watching Phoebe ride the carousel that it is her choice whether she will reach for the gold ring and live a fulfilling life or fall from the horse into the depths of corruption. Holden Caulfield, like many teenagers, is lost on how to transition from childhood to adulthood. While it is not possible to guarantee a teenager will grow into a responsible adult, a supportive environment, along with effective role models, can provide stability and guidance to help them mature into this role. Works Cited Alsen, Eberhard. Westport: Greenwood Press, Pinsker, Sanford. New York: Twayne Publishers, Privitera, Lisa. Salinger's the Catcher in the Rye. Literature Resource Center. Salinger, J. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, Seng, Peter J.

Works Cited Alsen, Eberhard. Westport: Greenwood Press,

To a great degree he is numb to the pains and joys of life. This shift in mindset disturbs Holden deeply, demonstrating his deep-seeded fear of adopting the adulthood mindset that includes money, liquor, and sex. This is evidenced after the ordeal with Mr. You ought to go to a boys' school sometime. There is no allure in growing older.