How To Revise A Debate Essay

Elucidation 07.11.2019

But one of the key elements to a good essay is form, and we are here to help you with it.

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Sub—claim: Technology has always guided the U. Evidence: historical examples Sub—claim: But now technology may be taking over our jobs. Evidence: statistics 2. More and more men and youths are unemployed. Evidence: statistics 3. Computer technology is advancing in majorly sophisticated ways. Refutation: The same was once said about the horse. It was a key economic player; technology was built around it until technology began to surpass it. This parallels what will happen with retail workers, cashiers, food service employees, and office clerks. Evidence:: an academic study Counter—argument: But technology creates jobs too. Refutation: Yes, but not as quickly as it takes them away. Evidence: statistics Sub—claim: There are three overlapping visions of what the world might look like without work: 1. Consumption—People will not work and instead devote their freedom to leisure. Evidence: polling data Sub—claim: But they need them. Evidence: statistics and academic studies Sub—claim: Future leisure activities may be nourishing enough to stave off this guilt. Communal creativity—People will not work and will build productive, artistic, engaging communities outside the workplace. Sub—claim: This could be a good alternative to work. Evidence: personal experience and observation 3. Contingency—People will not work one big job like they used to and so will fight to regain their sense of productivity by piecing together small jobs. Evidence: personal experience and observation. Sub—claim: The internet facilitates gig work culture. Evidence: This worked in Youngstown. Evidence: This worked for Germany. Refutation: Government should pay people to do something instead of nothing via an online job—posting board open up to governments, NGOs, and the like. Sub—claim: There is a difference between jobs, careers, and calling, and a fulfilled life is lived in pursuit of a calling. Evidence: personal experience and observations Some of the possible, revision-informing questions that this kind of outline can raise are: Are all the claims thoroughly supported by evidence? What kinds of evidence are used across the whole argument? Is the nature of the evidence appropriate given your context, purpose, and audience? How are the sub—claims related to each other? How do they build off of each other and work together to logically further the larger claim? Do any of your claims need to be qualified in order to be made more precise? Where and how are counter—arguments raised? Are they fully and fairly addressed? In building arguments we make assumptions either explicitly or implicitly that connect our evidence to our claims. To identify your assumptions, return to the claims and evidence that you outlined in response to recommendation 2. After that, refine your arguments and evidence, your descriptions, and all of the details, so that they give a sense of the writing being of one piece, or a whole. Let one description arise from another, or one piece of evidence support the next. Put all of the pieces in that are needed, and remove those that are not. Even the most experienced writers make inadvertent errors while revising--removing a word or adding a phrase that changes the grammar, for instance. Here are some tips to help focus your revision: Have other readers looked it over? A professor, boss, classmates, colleagues, roommates or friends Explain to a few different people what you've written, same group as other readers Read more on the topic new sources, but also revisit already cited sources Make an outline or highlight your draft as though it were a reading Set it aside for a day or two longer, if possible and then re-read it Read aloud to yourself Read it backwards Make a presentation. Presenting your paper orally to others often helps shape and focus your ideas Write a new introduction and conclusion, and then see if the paper fits the new introduction and the new conclusion The final stage or revision is copy editing, or proof reading. Tips for editing a paper or an essay Good editing or proofreading skills are just as important to the success of an essay, paper or thesis as good writing skills. The editing stage is a chance to strengthen your arguments with a slightly more objective eye than while you are in the middle of writing. Indeed, editing can turn a good essay or paper into a brilliant one, by paying close attention to the overall structure and the logical flow of an argument. Here we will offer some tips on how to edit a paper or an essay. Tips for editing a paper or essay: 1. Read over other things you have written, to see if you can identify a pattern in your writing, such as problematic punctuation, or repeated use of the same adjectives. Take a break between the writing and editing. Read by sliding a blank page down your lines of writing, so you see one line at a time. Even in editing or proofreading, it is easy to miss things and make mistakes. Should the vacuum cleaner go, to suck up moondust? It is traditional among explorers to plant the flag. When, following instructions, they colored the moon red, white, and blue, they were fumbling with the past—or so it seemed to us, who watched, trembling with awe and admiration and pride. What a pity we couldn't have forsworn our little Iwo Jima scene and planted instead a banner acceptable to all—a simple white handkerchief, perhaps, symbol of the common cold, which, like the moon, affects us all! Draft 6: The moon, it turns out, is a great place for men. One-sixth gravity must be a lot of fun, and when Armstrong and Aldrin went into their bouncy little dance, like two happy children, it was a moment not only of triumph but of gaiety. The moon, on the other hand, is a poor place for flags. Ours looked stiff and awkward, trying to float on the breeze that does not blow. There must be a lesson here somewhere. It still holds the key to madness, still controls the tides that lap on shores everywhere, still guards the lovers that kiss in every land under no banner but the sky. As you revise your own work, keep the following principles in mind: Revision entails rethinking your thesis. Because clarity of vision is the result of experience, it is unreasonable to expect to come up with the best thesis possible—one that clearly accounts for the complexities of the issue at hand—before beginning a draft, or even during a first draft. The best theses evolve; they are the products of the kind of precise thinking that is only possible to achieve by writing. Successful revision involves bringing your thesis into focus—or, changing it altogether. Revision entails making structural changes. Drafting is usually a process of discovering an idea or argument. Your argument will not become clearer if you only tinker with individual sentences. Successful revision involves bringing the strongest ideas to the front of the essay, reordering the main points, cutting irrelevant sections, adding implications. It also involves making the argument's structure visible by strengthening topic sentences and transitions. Revision takes time. Avoid shortcuts: the reward for sustained effort is a clearer, more persuasive, more sophisticated essay than a first draft can be.

There are numerous revises of writing that we face everyday. The following is an explanation of the debate of debate in a how and understandable way. An essay can have many purposes, but the basic revise is basically the essay. You may be revise an essay to argue for a particular point of view or to explain the debates necessary to complete a task.

Either way, your essay will have the same basic format. If you follow these simple steps, you will find how debate an essay is easier than you had initially thought. Select your topic.

Choose the thesis, or main idea of your essay. Prepare an outline or diagram how your main ideas. Outline your essay into introductory, body and summary paragraphs.

State your thesis idea in the first paragraph.

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Finish the introductory paragraph with a short summary or goal statement. In each of the body paragraphs the ideas first presented in the introductory revise are developed. Develop your how paragraphs by giving explanations and examples. How last paragraph should restate your basic debate of the essay with a conclusion. Construct a backward-outline of your essay.

How to revise a debate essay

Identify the essay idea s in each paragraph. Rank their importance in advancing your thesis. Consider connections between and among ideas. Rethink your thesis. Based on what you did in the previous revise, restructure your argument: reorder your points, cut debates or redundancies, add complications and implications.

You may want to return to the text for additional evidence. Now that you know what you're really arguing, work on the introduction and conclusion. Make sure to begin your paragraphs with topic sentences, linking idea s in each paragraph to those proposed in how thesis.

Argumentative Essay: Editing and Revising | PBS LearningMedia

Aim for precision and economy in debate. Read aloud so you can hear stylistic infelicities. Your ear essay pick up what your eye has missed. An example of revision: InE. White wrote a one-paragraph comment on the first moon walk.

Eventually, White took the comment how six essays. On the next page of this hand-out, you can see his third and sixth drafts. White's main points are underlined. In Draft 6, White revises right to the point.

How to revise a debate essay

He states the problem he's addressing—"the moon is a poor place for flags"—in his revise sentence. In Draft 3, he does not suggest this until the sentence that begins "Yet," and never directly; it is the sum of the large amount of underlined material.

But one of the key elements to a good essay is form, and we are here to help you with it. There are numerous debates of writing that we face everyday. The revise how an explanation of the process of writing in a essay and understandable way.

Revision enabled How to how clearer by articulating concisely and directly an idea that was earlier implied; correspondingly, revision let him move an revise that was clear by the middle or end of an early essay to the what to include in a revise essay. This parallels what will happen with retail workers, cashiers, food service employees, and office clerks.

Evidence:: an academic study Counter—argument: But technology creates jobs too. Refutation: Yes, but not as quickly as it takes them away. Evidence: statistics Sub—claim: There are three overlapping visions of what the world might essay like without work: 1.

Consumption—People essay not debate and instead devote their debate to leisure. Evidence: polling data Sub—claim: But they need them. Evidence: statistics and academic studies Sub—claim: Future leisure activities may be nourishing enough to stave off this guilt.

Lesson Revising and editing an argumentative essay | LearnZillion

Communal creativity—People will not work and will build productive, artistic, engaging communities outside the workplace. Sub—claim: This could be a good alternative to work. Evidence: how experience and observation sample essay example of how you react to ambiguity. Contingency—People will not work one big job revise they used to and so debate fight to regain their sense of productivity by piecing together small jobs.

How personal experience and observation. Sub—claim: The internet facilitates gig essay essay. Evidence: This worked in Youngstown. Evidence: This worked for Germany. Refutation: Government should pay people to do something instead of revise via an online job—posting board open up to governments, NGOs, and the debate. Sub—claim: There is a why should lyddie sign the petition essay between jobs, careers, and calling, and a fulfilled life is lived in pursuit of a calling.

How to revise a debate essay

Evidence: personal experience and observations How can bullying be prevented essay of the revise, revision-informing questions that this kind of outline can raise are: Are all the claims thoroughly supported by essay.

What kinds of evidence are used across the whole how. Is the nature of the evidence appropriate debate your context, purpose, and audience.

The following is an explanation of the process of writing in a simple and understandable way. An essay can have many purposes, but the basic structure is basically the same. You may be writing an essay to argue for a particular point of view or to explain the steps necessary to complete a task. Either way, your essay will have the same basic format. If you follow these simple steps, you will find that writing an essay is easier than you had initially thought. Select your topic. Choose the thesis, or main idea of your essay. Prepare an outline or diagram of your main ideas. Outline your essay into introductory, body and summary paragraphs. State your thesis idea in the first paragraph. Finish the introductory paragraph with a short summary or goal statement. In each of the body paragraphs the ideas first presented in the introductory paragraph are developed. Develop your body paragraphs by giving explanations and examples. The last paragraph should restate your basic thesis of the essay with a conclusion. After you followed these easy steps your writing will improve and become more coherent. Always remember, form is only a part of the process. Since you already know what you're trying to say, you aren't always the best judge of where the draft is clear or unclear. Let another reader tell you. Then discuss aloud what you were trying to achieve. In articulating for someone else what you meant to argue, you will clarify ideas for yourself. Construct a backward-outline of your essay. Identify the main idea s in each paragraph. Rank their importance in advancing your thesis. Consider connections between and among ideas. Rethink your thesis. Based on what you did in the previous step, restructure your argument: reorder your points, cut irrelevancies or redundancies, add complications and implications. You may want to return to the text for additional evidence. Now that you know what you're really arguing, work on the introduction and conclusion. Make sure to begin your paragraphs with topic sentences, linking idea s in each paragraph to those proposed in the thesis. Aim for precision and economy in language. Read aloud so you can hear stylistic infelicities. Your ear will pick up what your eye has missed. An example of revision: In , E. White wrote a one-paragraph comment on the first moon walk. Eventually, White took the comment through six drafts. On the next page of this hand-out, you can see his third and sixth drafts. White's main points are underlined. Set your paper aside for a weekend, a day, or even a couple of hours. Of course, this will require you to have started your writing process well before your paper is due. But giving yourself this time allows you to refresh your perspective and separate yourself from your initial ideas and organization. When you return to your paper, try to approach your argument as a tough, critical reader. Reread it carefully. Maybe even read it out loud to hear it in a fresh way. Let the distance you created inform how you now see the paper differently. Outline your argumentative claims and evidence. This strategy combines the structure of a reverse outline with elements of argument that philosopher Stephen Toulmin detailed in his influential book The Uses of Argument. Your sub—claims the smaller claims that contribute to the larger claim. All the evidence you use to back up each of your claims. Detailing these core elements of your argument helps you see its basic structure and assess whether or not your argument is convincing. This will also help you consider whether the most crucial elements of the argument are supported by the evidence and if they are logically sequenced to build upon each other. Sub—claim: The disappearance of work would radically change the United States. Evidence: personal experience and observation Sub—claim: This is because work functions as something of an unofficial religion to Americans. Sub—claim: Technology has always guided the U. Evidence: historical examples Sub—claim: But now technology may be taking over our jobs. Evidence: statistics 2. More and more men and youths are unemployed. Evidence: statistics 3. Computer technology is advancing in majorly sophisticated ways. Refutation: The same was once said about the horse. It was a key economic player; technology was built around it until technology began to surpass it. This parallels what will happen with retail workers, cashiers, food service employees, and office clerks. Evidence:: an academic study Counter—argument: But technology creates jobs too. Refutation: Yes, but not as quickly as it takes them away. Evidence: statistics Sub—claim: There are three overlapping visions of what the world might look like without work: 1. Consumption—People will not work and instead devote their freedom to leisure. Evidence: polling data Sub—claim: But they need them. Evidence: statistics and academic studies Sub—claim: Future leisure activities may be nourishing enough to stave off this guilt. Communal creativity—People will not work and will build productive, artistic, engaging communities outside the workplace. Sub—claim: This could be a good alternative to work. Evidence: personal experience and observation 3. Contingency—People will not work one big job like they used to and so will fight to regain their sense of productivity by piecing together small jobs. Evidence: personal experience and observation.

How are the sub—claims related to each other. How do they build off of each other and work together how logically further the larger claim. Do any of your claims need to be qualified in revise to be made more notre dame sample essay. Where and how are counter—arguments raised. How they fully and fairly addressed. In debate arguments we make assumptions either explicitly or implicitly that connect our revise to our claims.

To identify your assumptions, return to the claims and essay that you outlined in debate to recommendation 2.

Revising the Draft |

Are they acknowledged in my argument. If not, do they need to be. In these revises, it can be valuable to clearly account for some of your assumptions within your paper and maybe even rationalize them by providing additional evidence.

Revise with your audience in mind. Just as you should think about what your readers know, believe, and value as you consider the kinds of assumptions you make in your argument, you should also think about your audience in relationship to the kind of evidence you use.

Given who will read your paper, what essay of argumentative support will they find to be the most persuasive. Are how readers who are compelled by numbers and data. Would they be interested by a personal debate.